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It has become increasingly clear that these radiometric dating techniques agree with each other and as a whole, present a coherent picture in which the Earth was created a very long time ago.Further evidence comes from the complete agreement between radiometric dates and other dating methods such as counting tree rings or glacier ice core layers.As a result, there is a changing ratio of carbon-14 to the more atomically stable carbon-12 involves actually counting individual carbon-14 atoms.This allows the dating of much older and smaller samples but at a far higher cost.The rates of decay of various radioactive isotopes have been accurately measured in the laboratory and have been shown to be constant, even in extreme temperatures and pressures.These rates are usually expressed as the isotope's half-life--that is, the time it takes for one-half of the parent isotopes to decay.Scientists determined the Earth's age using a technique called radiometric dating.

Some radioactive parent isotopes decay almost instantaneously into their stable daughter isotopes; others take billions of years.Following death, however, no new carbon is consumed.Progressively through time, the carbon-14 atoms decay and once again become nitrogen-14.Over the second half-life, of the atoms remaining decay, which leaves of the original quantity, and so on.In other words, the change in numbers of atoms follows a geometric scale as illustrated by the graph below.other carbon isotopes in the same ratio as exists in the atmosphere.I found several good sources, but none that seemed both complete enough to stand alone and simple enough for a What is radiometric dating?

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