Trends of interracial dating

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Newlyweds are a subset of the “currently married” population, which includes individuals whose marital status is “married, spouse present.” When comparing characteristics of detailed groups of newlyweds by race/ethnicity as well as gender patterns, only intermarried couples involving a white spouse are analyzed, and they represent about 68% of all intermarried newlywed couples between 20.

For illustration purposes, “/” (not specifying gender) and “-” (specifying gender) are used to indicate different types of couples.

By Wendy Wang This report analyzes the demographic and economic characteristics of newlyweds who marry spouses of a different race or ethnicity, and compares the traits of those who “marry out” with those who “marry in.” The newlywed pairs are grouped by the race and ethnicity of the husband and wife, and are compared in terms of earnings, education, age of spouse, region of residence and other characteristics.

This report is primarily based on the Pew Research Center’s analysis of data from the U. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) in 2008-2010 and on findings from three of the Center’s own nationwide telephone surveys that explore public attitudes toward intermarriage.

In surveys conducted in 20, fully 91% of Gen Y respondents born after 1976 said that interracial dating is acceptable, compared with 50% of the oldest generation (those reaching adulthood during WWII) who expressed this view. 6, 2005 among a randomly-selected, nationally-representative sample of 3,014 adults, there are also differences by race in family experiences with interracial marriage.

Also, blacks (91%) and Hispanics (90%) are more accepting of interracial dating than are non-Hispanic whites (71%). Blacks (37%) are twice as likely as whites (17%) to have an immediate family member in an interracial marriage, while Hispanics (27%) fall in the middle of those two groups.

Compare this to 1960 when only 0.4 percent of US marriages were multiracial.

“Intra-marriage” and “marrying in” refer to marriages between spouses of the same race or ethnicity.

“Newly married” or “newlyweds” refer to couples who got married in the past 12 months prior to the survey date (American Community Survey).

(There were not enough Asians in the national sample to permit any meaningful analysis of this population sub-group).

There is also a variance by age in reports of interracial marriage in the family.

Newlywed couples in 2008-2010 combines three years’ data for newlyweds.

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