Depending on the usage of the machine, you might need a web server, a graphical desktop or anything in between.One of the best features of BSD is that there is a clear separation between the base system and external software. There are (at least) two ways to install third party software: with binary packages or with ports.Its components are updated using a tool called directory.While you can install and use alternatives to the bundled software, you cannot easily or safely remove the ones that are included in the base system as these are considered functionally essential parts of the operating system.As you can see, it's pretty awesome - and people recognize that. It can also be called via a cron script so your tree is updated automatically every night. Once you have /usr/ports populated with all the makefiles and patches, you're ready to begin installing whatever you need.The way it works is like this: you have a collection of makefiles and patches stored locally on your system. We'll go through a few basic tasks you might want to do, but first..The yum command line tool is used to install and update software packages under Cent OS / RHEL / Fedora Linux.

A browser based interface through which you can query using keywords is available at Simple enough, you say, I’ll just install the new version of Firefox also. except it might not be just Firefox, and there might be a chain of dependencies that have to be updated in a particular order.For example, Firefox depends a bunch of things that depend on the tiff library, which in turn depends on jpeg.Some of these things have to be rebuilt when the jpeg code changes, some do not.Dependency rebuilds have to be done in the correct order; jpeg has to be rebuilt before tiff can be rebuilt, and so on up the chain. ports/UPDATING ports/CHANGES head/UPDATING stable-8/UPDATING stable-9/UPDATING stable-10/UPDATING The code that generates the feeds is available under Free BSD license, you can get it on Git Hub.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!